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Posts for category: Obstetrics Gynecology

By Medical Arts OB/GYN
May 15, 2020
Tags: Colposcopy  
ColposcopyA colposcopy is an OBGYN procedure performed after abnormal test results for cervical cancer or unusual areas are detected on the vulva, vagina, or cervix. Pap smear results come back flagged if there’s a chance the cervix is infected with human papillomavirus (HPV). The entire exam takes between 5-15 minutes. The only difference between colposcopy and a Pap smear is that your OBGYN uses an instrument called a colposcope. Your OBGYN will walk you through the entire procedure. 
 
Why You Might Need a Colposcopy
 
Your OBGYN has reason to believe there is something wrong with your cervix. As mentioned, irregular pap smear results require a colposcopy. If you have already tested positive for HPV, it’s also necessary. Your OBGYN might also have noticed something unusual with your cervix during a pelvic exam. 
 
The results from your colposcopy can diagnose: 
  • Genital warts
  • Precancerous changes to the vagina, vulva, or cervix
  • Vulvar, cervical, or vaginal cancer
  • Cervicitis
What to Expect During the Procedure
 
This is a nonsurgical procedure your OBGYN will perform in their office. You’ll undress from the waist down and put on a medical gown. The doctor will have you lie down on the exam table and place your feet in the stirrups. Next, they use a speculum to open your vagina. This opens up the walls so the cervix is more visible. 
 
Because the procedure is somewhat uncomfortable, numbing medication or certain types of sedation are used. Once you are feeling comfortable, the next step is to clean the cervix. This gives your OBGYN a better view. The colposcope can now be used. This is a magnifying instrument placed right outside the vulva. A light shines through it and brightens the cervix. All the unusual areas on the cervix are made completely clear. A biopsy is then taken of these abnormal cells for further testing. 
 
After everything is done, expect some mild discomfort. It’s similar to having a slight period cramp. In the next few days, you’ll experience spotting, bleeding, or dark discharge. 
 
Before Your Appointment
 
You’re going to want to make sure that your appointment doesn’t take place during your period. This makes it much easier for your OBGYN to perform the colposcopy. For at least twenty-four hours before your appointment, avoid using creams like medicine, douches, tampons, and engaging in vaginal sex.
 
Make sure to let your doctor know beforehand if you’re pregnant or on any blood thinner medication. 
By Medical Arts OB/GYN
February 27, 2020

Did you know that cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer for women worldwide? While this statistic can be startling the good news is that it is one of the most preventable cancers. A cervical cancer screening is one of the best and most reliable tools our OBGYN has to detect cancerous and precancerous cells within the cervix. This screening is most often referred to as a Pap test.

What is a Pap test?

Women as young as 21 years old should start getting routine cervical cancer screenings from their OBGYN. If results from the first Pap smear are normal then women between the ages of 21 to 29 will only need to get a Pap test every three years. Women with an abnormal Pap will require a repeat Pap test to look for the presence of precancerous cells.

Women between the ages of 30 to 65 should get a cervical cancer screening every 5 years. Once a woman reaches 65 years old, she usually won’t need to undergo cervical cancer screenings any longer. Women at high risk for cervical cancer may need to come in more often for screenings. This is something that you can discuss with your gynecologist during your first screening or next annual wellness exam.

Are there other ways to prevent cervical cancer?

Along with getting routine cervical cancer screenings your OBGYN can also provide a way to protect young women from contracting HPV, a common STI that is also the leading cause of cervical cancer. The HPV vaccine is often recommended for young women around the age of 11 or 12.

This vaccine can be administered to women between the ages of 13 and 26 who have not contracted HPV. The vaccine comes in three doses and it protects against the strains of HPV that are most likely to cause cervical cancer. Even if women have received the HPV vaccine they should still come in for routine screenings and checkups.

Whether you want to learn more about the HPV vaccine or you need to schedule your annual checkup and Pap smear, turn to your OBGYN today to take an active interest in your reproductive health.

By Medical Arts OB/GYN
February 12, 2020
Tags: IUD  

More women in the US than ever before have an IUD, or intrauterine device. IUDs have become a popular birth control method for women because of its “set it and forget it” approach. If you’ve been hearing your girlfriend talking about how much they love their IUD it may have you thinking whether or not this is the right option for you. An OBGYN can answer all of your questions and help you make an informed decision about your family planning needs.

Here’s what you should know about getting an IUD and what to expect when you want it removed,

There are different kinds of IUDs

Your gynecologist will discuss the different options during your consultation. There are a variety of different hormonal (progestin-releasing) IUDs on the market; however, if you experience negative effects from hormonal birth control then non-hormonal birth control such as the Paragard (copper) IUD may be the best option for you.

This copper IUD will prevent pregnancy as soon as it’s placed and it can last up to 10 years. The average lifespan of a hormonal IUD is 3-5 years.

The IUD placement procedure is fast

To get an IUD your gynecologist will place a speculum into the vagina where they will then insert the IUD into the opening of your cervix where it will remain in the uterus. The simple procedure is performed right in your gynecologist’s office and it only takes a couple of minutes to place. You may be instructed to take an over-the-counter pain reliever prior to reduce cramping and a local numbing medication may also be applied to the cervix prior to the insertion.

Every woman will respond differently to getting an IUD. Some women may be able to return to work the very same day while others may need to take some time off. It’s best to err on the side of caution and maybe take the day off work so you can manage any symptoms you may have and just take it easy.

The IUD can be removed anytime

If you decide you do want to get pregnant or you no longer need birth control then you will want to discuss this with your gynecologist. The IUD removal process is simple and involves pulling the thread of the device so it collapses and slides right out. It’s important that you don’t try and remove the IUD on your own; it should always be removed by a qualified medical professional.

Have questions about getting an IUD? Want to find out whether this is the best birth control method for you? Then schedule an appointment with your gynecologist today.

By Medical Arts OB/GYN
January 30, 2020
Tags: Genetic Testing  

Finding out you’re pregnant is one of the most exciting moments for soon-to-be-parents. Throughout the course of your pregnancy you will want to have an OBGYN that you trust to guide you through the process and to provide you with the care and treatment you need to ensure a healthy pregnancy for both you and the baby. You will most likely be offered prenatal genetic testing during the first or second trimester of your pregnancy. If so, it’s important to understand more about genetic testing and why it’s done.

What is prenatal genetic testing?

These genetic tests are conducted during pregnancy to screen for certain birth defects and other fetal conditions. It is recommended that all pregnant women go through certain prenatal genetic testing, regardless of age or other risk factors. Of course, your obstetrician may recommend additional genetic testing if there are certain risk factors present.

What are the different kinds of prenatal genetic tests?

Here are the prenatal genetic tests that your OBGYN may offer or recommend:

First Trimester Screening

This screening involves both an ultrasound and blood test to check for certain birth defects including trisomy 18 (Edward’s syndrome), trisomy 13, neural tube defects and Down syndrome (trisomy 21). Even though these abnormalities increase with the mother’s age, it’s recommended that every pregnant women get this testing. This is usually the first set of prenatal genetic testing you’ll receive after you find out you’re pregnant.

Chorionic Villus Sampling

Chorionic Villus Sampling (CVS) is a prenatal test that detects genetic disorders, birth defects and other problems that may occur early on in the pregnancy. This procedure is usually performed within the first 10-12 weeks of a woman’s pregnancy at your OBGYN’s office. This testing can be performed as either a transabdominal CVS or transcervical CVS.

Amniocentesis

Amniocentesis allows your obstetrician to collect amniotic fluid, which can provide important insight into the health of your baby. Amniocentesis can check for fetal infections, can test your baby’s lungs, and check for genetic disorders such as Down syndrome. If amniocentesis is being performed for strictly genetic purposes then this is often performed between 15 to 20 weeks.

There are many reasons a woman or couple may choose to get genetic amniocentesis including advanced maternal age, positive results on other prenatal screenings or unusual ultrasound findings.

Cystic Fibrosis Carrier Screening

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common and dangerous genetic disorders. Since cystic fibrosis is inherited a simple blood test can be performed to see if you are a carrier for CF. Testing positive on the carrier test does not necessarily mean that you will have a child with CF.

AFP + Screening

Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a blood test that checks the levels of AFP (a protein produced by the baby’s liver) for signs of a birth defect, Down syndrome or neural tube defects. This test is usually offered between 15 and 20 weeks and is most often recommended in pregnant women over 35, as well as women with diabetes.

Your OBGYN is here to make sure that all of your questions and concerns about you and your baby’s health are addressed during your pregnancy, so if you have any questions about genetic testing your doctor would be happy to sit down with you and discuss these testing options.

By Medical Arts OB/GYN
January 15, 2020
Tags: Breast Exams   Mammogram  

Every two minutes a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer in the US, making breast cancer one of the most common cancers to affect American women. Your OBGYN believes in the importance of self-breast exams and getting regular checkups, which not only can detect issues early on but also could end up saving your life. Furthermore, by performing regular self-breast exams you get to understand how your breasts should look and feel so that you know right away when something feels amiss.

First and foremost, you should get used to performing a breast exam on yourself once a month. The best time to perform these exams is a few days after your period ends so your breasts will be less sore and swollen. Most breasts will feel lumpy; this should not be a cause for concern (this is completely normal).

If you notice a new lump or you notice any changes in the texture or shape of your breast then you should also make an appointment with your doctor. You should also seek medical attention if you notice soreness, redness, swelling, or dimpling of the skin. Once a year during your annual women’s checkup, your gynecologist will also perform a simple, noninvasive breast exam.

Women between the ages of 45 and 54 should also be getting a routine mammogram once a year along with their annual gynecological visit. Women over 55 years old should still get mammograms but may only need to get one once every other year. Those at an increased risk for developing breast cancer may need to visit their doctor before age 45 and more often for screenings.

Along with performing a breast examination your annual wellness checkup with an OBGYN is extremely important and shouldn’t be missed. While most women associate this annual gynecological exam with Pap smears, the visit involves so much more for your health. From adolescence until older adulthood, all women should visit their gynecologist for an annual examination to help prevent problems and detect issues early on when they are easily treatable.

During your annual checkup a gynecologist can:

  • Screen for and help prevent sexually transmitted infections
  • Detect and treat vaginal infections
  • Determine the cause of pelvic pain and irregular bleeding
  • Treat menstrual problems
  • Discuss birth control options
  • Determine breast changes

Many women will experience problems at some point during their lifetime, whether it’s a simple urinary tract infection, unexplained abdominal pain, or breast cancer. When problems arise it’s important that you have a gynecologist that you trust to provide you with the compassionate, understanding and delicate care you need. If it’s been more than a year since your annual OBGYN checkup, call your gynecologist today.